Posts tagged social media
8:50 am - Mon, Jun 3, 2013
129 notes
courtenaybird:

Teens on Social Media:

The Pew Research Center has released some interesting research into teens on social media. The major story that the press has taken from the research is that teens are supposedly tiring of Facebook, with many citing boredom due to “drama” and an ever-increasing adult presence.

(via We Are Social)

courtenaybird:

Teens on Social Media:

The Pew Research Center has released some interesting research into teens on social media. The major story that the press has taken from the research is that teens are supposedly tiring of Facebook, with many citing boredom due to “drama” and an ever-increasing adult presence.

(via We Are Social)

(via emergentfutures)

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4:25 am - Wed, Aug 22, 2012
32 notes
futuristgerd:

(via Total Worldwide Social Network Ad Revenues Continue Strong Growth - eMarketer)
Gerd says: social media is becoming a default now…

futuristgerd:

(via Total Worldwide Social Network Ad Revenues Continue Strong Growth - eMarketer)

Gerd says: social media is becoming a default now…

(via thenextweb)

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3:17 am - Fri, Apr 20, 2012
279 notes

On Loneliness & Technology

  • FJP: We've been reading different takes on digital social networks and how/if they impact solitude, loneliness, and offline socializing. Here is a mash-up of the conversations we've been following.
  • The Atlantic: Social media—from Facebook to Twitter—have made us more densely networked than ever. Yet for all this connectivity, new research suggests that we have never been lonelier (or more narcissistic)—and that this loneliness is making us mentally and physically ill.
  • NY Times: New communications technologies make living alone a social experience, so being home alone does not feel involuntary or like solitary confinement. The person alone at home can digitally navigate through a world of people, information and ideas. Internet use does not seem to cut people off from real friendships and connections.
  • The Atlantic: We have never been more detached from one another, or lonelier. In a world consumed by ever more novel modes of socializing, we have less and less actual society. We live in an accelerating contradiction: the more connected we become, the lonelier we are. We were promised a global village; instead we inhabit the drab cul-de-sacs and endless freeways of a vast suburb of information.
  • Slate: Articles about American alienation may well feel true to those who long for simpler, happier times, but they’re built on fables and fantasies. In fact, there’s zero evidence that we’re more detached or lonely than ever.
  • The New Yorker: M.I.T. psychologist Sherry Turkle, takes issue with the basic promises of digital connection. She thinks that togetherness, far from being strengthened by technology, has been crowded out by “the half-light of virtual community.”
  • The Atlantic: But it is clear that social interaction matters. Loneliness and being alone are not the same thing, but both are on the rise. We meet fewer people. We gather less. And when we gather, our bonds are less meaningful and less easy. The decrease in confidants—that is, in quality social connections—has been dramatic over the past 25 years.
  • The New Yorker: Klinenberg’s research suggests that our usual perceptions about life alone get things backward. Far from being a mark of social abandonment, the solo life tends to be a path for moving ahead, for taking control of one’s circumstances. And, rather than consigning individuals to suffer in their solitude, aloneness may come at a cost to the community. The single life is inherently self-interested: it calls for vigilance on matters of self-preservation both large (financial autonomy) and small (dish detergent), and, in many cases, it frees the solitary from the sorts of daily interaction that help craft a sense of shared responsibility.
  • NY Times: The Pew Internet Personal Networks and Community Survey — a nationally representative survey of 2,512 American adults conducted in 2008 that was the first to examine how the Internet and cellphones affect our core social networks — shows that Web use can lead to more social life, rather than to less. “Social Isolation and New Technology,” written by the Rutgers University communications scholar Keith Hampton, reveals that heavy users are more likely than others to have large and diverse social networks; more likely to visit parks, cafes and restaurants; and more likely to meet diverse people with different perspectives and beliefs.
  • The New Yorker: Given our digital habits, the question isn’t whether we should use technology to ease our loneliness. It’s how.
  • FJP (Jihii): Ah, key question. So, where do we stand? I'll quote Michael.
  • FJP (Michael): What do I think about social media? For my personal use it’s a bit of a time suck and I have to remind myself to step away from it, head outdoors and wrap my mind around something more substantive than the flurry of information I find myself in. For professional use it’s integral to the FJP’s ability to build audiences and engage with them. I can’t think of how we would be able to accomplish what we do without it. Societally, I’m a big believer in tools and platforms that allow people to connect, organize and share information. Social media increases the speed with which people can do so more than any other tool in history. This is great. My fear with it though is that people will increasingly build information silos around themselves and only hear and expose themselves to information that they want to hear, and from a partisan perspective from which they’d like to hear it. (http://bit.ly/HsAnMN)
  • FJP (Jihii): So yes, the power is in our hands, social media users. How do you choose to use your social networks? I think the key point is to continually check ourselves and reflect on just that.
  • PS: Sorry for the lack of links. This post format won't allow it. Here are links to the articles. (Note that both the NY Times piece and Slate piece are by Eric Klinenberg.)
  • NY Times: http://nyti.ms/I22q7e
  • Slate: http://slate.me/J8BJzY
  • The Atlantic: http://bit.ly/I0nwmI
  • The New Yorker: http://nyr.kr/InwNEz

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9:57 pm - Wed, Mar 21, 2012
This means something….

This means something….

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9:19 pm - Mon, Mar 19, 2012
6 notes

scritic:

The most interesting thing is their revenue model: Unlike other social networks, which waited years to monetize through advertising, Pinterest has taken a different route. They’re monetizing already by taking a cut on sales that pins on their site help generate. They partnered with a firm called SkimLinks, which automatically scans through every link posted on the site to see if it goes to a retail site with an affiliate program. If it finds that kind of link, it secretly adds an affiliate code that ensures Pinterest will make some cash from sales that derive from that link. It’s a clever game, particularly given the site’s users’ retail focus, but Pinterest probably should have disclosed the practice more openly. Interesting!

(via ayjay)

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6:59 am - Thu, Mar 8, 2012
32 notes
For the first time, more than 100 million Americans have smartphones, according to a report by research firm comScore MobileLens … About 234 million Americans over the age of 13 used cellphones in January, meaning that the penetration for smartphones in the U.S. is around 43.3%.

100 Million Americans Now Own Smartphones | Mashable (via smarterplanet)

now, how to get all of those smartphone owners to subscribe to digital content….?

(via emergentfutures)

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9:34 pm - Wed, Feb 29, 2012
47 notes

stoweboyd:

Eyal makes a good argument: that virality — users inviting their friends to try an app — is less important (and more annoying) than habitual use of apps: habit is the new viral.

Nir Eyal via TechCrunch

The Curated Web Will Run On Habits

Increasingly, companies will become experts at designing user habits. Curated Web companies already rely on these methods. This new breed of company, defined by the ability to help users find only the content they care about, includes such white-hot companies as Pinterest and Tumblr. These companies have habit formation embedded in their DNA. This is because data collection is at the heart of any Curated Web business and to succeed, they must predict what users will think is most personally relevant.

Curated Web companies can only improve if users tell their systems what they want to see more of. If users use the service sparingly, it is less valuable than if they use it habitually. The more the user engages with a Curated Web company, the more data the company has to tailor and improve the user’s experience. This self-improving feedback loop has the potential to be more useful – and more addictive — than anything we’ve seen before.

However, I think Eyal’s characterization — helping users ‘find only the content they care about’ — is too limited. Steve Jobs said the users don’t know what they want, so by extension, they don’t know what they care about.

Getting back to Eyal’s habituation remark, these new tools will have to meld into the user’s existing behaviors and amplify them in some adjacent way.

For example, I’ve started to experiment with the user of Timely.is instead of Bitly as a way to publish Tweets. It ‘fits the hand’ in the sense that it works much like Bitly: a bookmarklet in the browser that creates an editable tweet with a shortened URL back to the source. Like Bitly, it provides stats on clickthroughs, but adds one additional feature: the ability to queue tweets and have them post over time.

So, I am able to develop a new Timely habit because it is similar to my habituated use of Bitly, but adding an additional capability. And there is a viral vestige: the promotion of Timely in the footer of the tweets.

(via emergentfutures)

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7:06 am - Mon, Feb 27, 2012
2 notes

Surprise! The news shows up in the least expected places Andrew Phelps, niemanlab.org
You’re flick­ing through tweets, read­ing email, Googling recipes, or watch­ing dogs stick­ing their heads out of car win­dows in slow motion when a head­line catch­es your eye. Before you know it, you’re read­ing the news, even though you didn’t…

Surprise! The news shows up in the least expected places
Andrew Phelps, niemanlab.org

You’re flick­ing through tweets, read­ing email, Googling recipes, or watch­ing dogs stick­ing their heads out of car win­dows in slow motion when a head­line catch­es your eye. Before you know it, you’re read­ing the news, even though you didn’t…

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6:56 am
1 note

business-geek:

clue: it’s not as much or as wide-ranging as you might think.

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6:48 am
1 note

seooptimizers:

In-Demand Social Media Jobs Without a doubt, strong social media skills are in high demand. From the job seeker perspective, this is great news, particular considering that the need for a social media presence is strong in practically every industry out there. Here are the top ten ways that the social media savvy…

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